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Booklets cont

The Creator's Sabbath Rest:
A Clue to Genesis 1

  Genesis l, or the first chapter of the first book in the Bible, has now for two millennia been a chief sticking point between science and religion. That chapter will indeed remain a source of endless embarrassment for the believer as long as it is taken for a sort of scientific cosmology, inviting thereby the baneful specter of concordism. It is shown in this booklet that Genesis 1 was not meant to be such a cosmology, but a parable with a most important moral: In Genesis 1 the Creator himself is set up as a role model for observing the sabbath after his greatest work, which is the creation of all. Once seen in this light, details, which in Genesis 1 relate to the particulars of the Hebrew world picture, will not call for a comparison with the ever vaster scientific knowledge about the unfolding of the universe.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-C5-4    32 pages    softcover    $3.00

 

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To Rebuild
Or Not To Try?

  Although our big newspapers report only on occasion about efforts aimed at rebuilding the TempIe in Jerusalem, those efforts are more intensely planned than one may suspect. In none of those reports does one find even a vague allusion to a monumental failure of a major effort, initiated by none other than Julian the Apostate in January 363. The enterprise, which energized Jewish enthusiasm, had to be aborted no sooner than it had begun. The reason was a series of events, truly miraculous when taken together: earthquake, violent winds, eruption of fire from the ground, and the spectacular appearance of a cross in the sky. Most educated Catholics do not seem to be aware of all this. Yet the historical evidence is beyond any dispute. The documents are presented here concisely and meticulously by a Catholic scholar, internationally known for his books on the relation of science and faith.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-C6-2    32 pages    softcover    $3.00

 

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Christ and Science

  Science is very much a late-comer in history. This is so because the three laws of motion, on which even the latest in physics depends, first appeared together in Newton's Principia. Of those three laws, the first, which is about inertial motion, is the most fundamental. Its first appearance in the High Middle Ages led eventually to Copernicus and to Newton. In other words, the question about the late coming of science is about the late coming of the first law of motion. Why is it that although that law appears to be so natural, it came to be formulated in none of the great ancient (and pagan) cultures, but in the medieval Christian West? The question is momentous because exact science assures control over nature and secures for the modern West its global dominance. As shown in this booklet, which summarizes its author's major studies on the subject, the answer to that question lies with a particular facet of belief in Christ as the "only begotten Son of God." There is, indeed, a very deep reason, both scientific and theological, that justifies the tying of Christ and science together.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-C7-0    32 pages    softcover    $3.00

 

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Giordano Bruno:
A Martyr of Science?

  The fourth centenary of Bruno's having been burnt at the stake on February 17, 1600 was the occasion for a number of conferences and, of course, for a flood of newspaper and magazine articles. Bruno was almost invariably celebrated as a martyr of science and of a reason unfettered by religious dogmas. The anniversary was a choice opportunity for those who thrive on flaying the Catholic Church while turning a blind eye on Bruno's true mental physiognomy. Contrary to the widely entertained cliché, Bruno was not burnt to death for his cosmological views. These were minuscule items in the vast list of heretical statements that could easily be culled from Bruno's writings. In promoting his cosmological views Bruno gave ample evidence of his total commitment to Hermetic magic and pseudomysticism. The purpose of this booklet is to set the record straight.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-C8-9    32 pages    softcover    $3.00

 

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Maybe Alone in the Universe,
After All

    The project known as SETI (Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence) should not have started at all about forty years ago. But now a study has just appeared that amounts to a devastating blow at SETI aficionados. Needless to say, the project will go on, in spite of the scientific evidence set forth in Rare Earth. In this booklet it is argued that the project had far less chance than finding a needle in a haystack. Por decades a blind eye was turned on the Earth-Moon system as a unique configuration in our solar system. SETI scientists, who could be so cavalier with scientific evidence, may not be expected to ponder some stark lessons of the strange, most unexpected rise of science on our Earth. Add to this the soberly emerging fact that life on our Earth was repeatedly devastated through the impact of huge meteors. But even more than life, science cannot be taken for granted on this Earth. The Moon around the Earth may even suggest that it makes little sense to poke fun at Christ as a savior who has to hop from planet to planet.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-C9-7    32 pages    softcover    $3

 

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Galileo Lessons

    The Galileo case does not cease to intrigue. It has been used and abused in a simplistic way most of the time. Galileo is usually presented as a heroic intellect taking a courageous stance on behalf of science. The Church, which condemned him, is, for the most time, depicted as a villain standing in the way of progress. Undoubtedly, Galileo's condemnation was a painful lesson for the Church, which wisely kept silent about Darwinian evolution. But the Galileo case means for the Church much more than the counsel of caution. What triumphed in the Galileo case was the respect for the quantitative ordering of things, which is independent of any revelation and cannot be overruled by it as long as the Creator and the Redeemer are the same God. Scientists in turn may learn an all-important scientific lesson from Galileo's failure to provide an "absolutely demonstrative proof" of heliocentrism, which at that time stood for the universe. As it turned out, the actual ordering of the universe cannot definitively be fathomed by science. Worse, a new Galileo case may loom large, which may discredit not the Church but the scientists' use of science.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-19-4    32 pages    softcover    $3

 

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Jesus,
Islam, Science

    September 11, 2001 made it clear that the third millennium will be a clash of civilizations insofar as civilizations are cultures and cultures are driven by cults determined by creeds. This may be a painful lesson far an ever more secularist Western world, but it cannot ignore the fearsome exclamation marks into which a handful of Muslim fundamentalists turned the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center. Hopefully, those desperados mirror the sentiments of only a fraction of Muslims who harbor much resentment against the West. Having exchanged Christian morality for secularist immorality, the West cannot comprehend the measure of that resentment. Nor can a West, having grown oblivious to Christian dogmas, appreciate the significance of Muslim antagonism to faith in Jesus' divinity. Herein lies a rub both far the West and for Islam in an age of science. Obsessed as it is with its science, the West is woefully ignorant of the fact that belief in that divinity sparked the rise of science in the Western world. Desperately trying to industrialize, the Muslim world will have to develop respect for the facts of nature. From there it may advance to respect for the facts of history, of which none is greater than the fact of Jesus. Herein lies the supreme challenge posed to Islam by a science which is Western, though the West prefers to ignore the real reason of the Western origin of science.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-20    32 pages    softcover    $3

 

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The One True Fold: Newman and His Converts

A fascinating glimpse of the most prominent convert of our time and thse who followed him.  Now that the Church has officially recognized the heroic character of his virtues, it is not daring to say that his conversion was truly a heroic act in the moral sense.

In questions of right or wrong there is nothing really strong in the whole world, nothing decisive and operative, but the voice of him, to whom have been committed the keys of the kingdom and the oversight of Christ's flock. The voice of Peter is now, as it ever has been, a real authority, infallible when it teaches. . . . Before it speaks, the most saintly may mistake, and after it has spoken, the most gifted must obey. . . . All who take part with Peter are on the winning side.
- John Henry Newman, Cathedra Sempiterna (1853)

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-01-1  •  32 pages  •  softcover  •  $3



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